Category Archives: Podcast

Swarfcast Ep. 22 – Federico Veneziano on Machining Business Around the World

By Noah Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with Federico Veneziano.

On today’s podcast we interviewed Federico Veneziano, COO and CFO of American Micro, a 100 person machining company near Cincinnati, Ohio. In the interview Federico compared the various philosophies he has observed in machining companies throughout Europe, China and the United States.

Federico grew up in northern Italy and got his first job as a CNC machine operator when he was 12. He studied engineering in Italy and worked in several shops until he was hired by DMG as a service technician in his early 20s. For several years at DMG he worked on machines in shops all over the world, and in 2005 he was assigned a large project to install a Gildemeister GMC35 at American Micro in Batavia, Ohio. After observing Federico’s work on the project American Micro’s management saw great potential in Federico and he joined the company the following year.

Question: What is the best way for a machining company to find good employees?

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Swarfcast Ep. 21 – John Saunders, Entrepreneur and Self-taught Machinist

By Noah Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with John Saunders.

In today’s podcast we interviewed John Saunders, founder of Saunders Machine Works and the creator of the NYC CNC YouTube channel. John is an innovative entrepreneur who lives and breaths CNC machining. When he was 24 he had an idea to sell an automatically resetting steel target for practicing firearms, but he had no engineering background, no CAD experience and no machining experience. After working on a prototype with a contracted engineer he decided that before he would pursue production of his product he wanted to fully understand the production process.

He bought a Taig CNC milling machine and put it in his one-bedroom New York City apartment. He quickly realized he was passionate about CNC machining and taught himself to use his machine on nights and weekends for two years. Using resources on the Web, instructional DVDs and New York’s MakerSpace NYC community he eventually gained the skills to machine a prototype of his automatically resetting target by himself. Since his first time experimenting with his Taig until today he has religiously documented his machining projects on YouTube and now NYC CNC has acquired over 273,000 subscribers.

Today Saunders with a staff of six employees, runs a machine shop in his hometown of Zanesville, OH. His company runs an intensive training course on machining and welding, and it uploads at least one YouTube video a week about machining. He also cohosts a weekly podcast where he discusses his challenges running a small machining business.

Question: What practical skills have you learned on the Internet?

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Swarfcast Ep. 20 – Scott Roy on Machines that will Think Like Humans

By Noah and Lloyd Graff

In today’s podcast we interviewed Scott Roy, a Senior Staff Engineer at Google who specializes in artificial intelligence.  He also happens to be my brother-in-law (Lloyd’s son-in-law).  One of Scott’s most recent projects at Google is to improve the way machines communicate with people in diverse human languages—last week he was working on communicating in Bengali.

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with Scott Roy.

Scott believes that one day machines may have the sophistication and human-like qualities of Commander Data on Star Trek: The Next Generation.  He says there is a good chance machines will be able to feel emotions like love or the joy of watching baseball, and people will be able to teach them ethics.  Although he recognizes the risks of possible harm to humans by super intelligent machines, his work is motivated by his vision of a relationship in which machines enable people to thrive.

Question: Are you more excited or afraid of super intelligent machines?

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Swarfcast Ep. 19 – Rick Rickerson on Educating Engineers to Understand Machining

By Noah and Lloyd Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with Rick Rickerson.

Rick Rickerson is in charge of the machining lab at Purdue’s Northwest Indiana campus in Hammond.  In today’s podcast he talks about why he loves his job. “It’s all about students” he says.  His passion for teaching beams throughout the interview.

Rick has been doing this job for 14 years.  His department has a half-dozen South Bend lathes (now made in Utah), but the students gravitate to the Haas VF-2 vertical machining centers.

The part of his duties that really gets the students’ juices going is the Purdue Northwest racing team.  Every year students all over the country build a Baja-type racing buggy with the same Briggs and Stratton engine.  They build it from scratch and are responsible for every nut, bolt and weld.  Thousands of hours go into the preparation for two races in the spring presided over by SME judges.  The preparation is strenuous, and the races are exhausting for the students and Rick, but he loves it.  The judges grill the student builders and racers about the vehicles.  Once they get on a track the buggies invariably break down, and the kids have to rebuild them on the spot.  It’s a fantastic learning experience.

Question: Is building a Baja-type racing buggy from scratch a good way to learn machining?

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Swarfcast Ep. 18 – Jerry Levine on Why Global Warming is Not a Problem

By Noah and Lloyd Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with Jerry Levine.

In today’s podcast we interviewed Jerry Levine. A chemical engineer, Jerry Levine’s working career stretched from polyester to politics. He led the team at Amoco Chemicals that conquered the production problems in making polyester in the 1960s.

Jerry then learned what it was like to live under Communism when he helped set up a polyester plant in East Germany well before the Berlin Wall came down.

He later returned to Amoco’s corporate office in Chicago, finding his niche as a lobbyist for the company and “Big Oil.”

Jerry holds the view that Global Warming fears have been fueled by faulty and sometimes deliberately contrived data to protect scientific jobs and reputations, and to build political careers. He feels that ardent advocates of Global Warming theories often have “no growth” philosophies which mask hidden Socialist agendas.

Question: Do you believe global warming is mostly caused by human activity?

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Swarfcast Ep. 17 – Making it in America with Armand Barnils

By Noah and Lloyd Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with Armand Barnils.

In today’s podcast we interviewed Armand Barnils, plant manager of the U.S. division of Ventura Precision Components, a multinational precision machining company headquartered in Barcelona, Spain.

Armand grew up on the outskirts of Barcelona and studied Industrial Engineering in Spain. Through a foreign exchange program he came to the United States and earned a Masters Degree in Industrial Technology and Operations at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

At age 23 he moved to Pasadena, Texas, just outside of Houston, to work at Ventura Precision Components. Two years later his boss left, and at just 25 years old he became the shop’s plant manager.

In the interview Armand recounted his life’s journey from Barcelona to Chicago to Pasadena, Texas, and opined on the career opportunities he believes are unique to the United States.

Question: Do you believe in the American Dream?

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Swarfcast Ep. 16 – Bill Cox on the Evolution of a Machining Business

By Noah and Lloyd Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with Bill Cox.

In today’s podcast we interviewed Bill Cox, owner of Cox Manufacturing in San Antonio, Texas, a job shop that makes parts for a variety of industries—oil and energy, medical, and defense to name a few.

Bill’s father started the company in 1956 but died when Bill was age 12. The evening of his father’s funeral a customer had the audacity to ask Bill’s mother if he could buy the company. She asked Bill that night if he was interested in going into the family business and Bill said he was. From that day forward Bill’s mom, a sharp business woman in her own right, taught him the management side of running the company, while the guys in the shop developed his technical skills. By his 20s Bill was taking the helm at Cox Manufacturing.

We at Graff-Pinkert have had the pleasure of dealing with Bill for decades, on both the buying and selling side of the equipment trade. He continues to impress us with his business savvy and grasp of the trends in the machining business.

Question: Are current wage levels too low to attract good enough good people for machine shops?

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Swarfcast Ep. 15 – George Breiwa on Machining Vaporizers

By Noah Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with George Breiwa.

About two months ago I got a call from a company asking for a price on a Traub TNL18 on our Graff-Pinkert Website. For those unfamiliar, Traub makes arguably the heaviest, most expensive and advanced CNC Swiss machines on the market—the “the Hummer of CNC Swiss” one could say. I asked the caller what his application was, thinking it was a medical part to justify such an expensive machine, but the caller told me it was for making a unique vaporizer that had no moving parts and no battery.

George Breiwa started his company DynaVap to produce a mechanism called a VapCap that gives smokers of tobacco and other substances (one legalized this week in Canada) an alternative to smoking. People have built vaporizers for a long time, but what makes DynaVap’s VapCap unique is that while other Vaporizers require a power source usually from batteries or a wall socket the VapCap operates using heat from an external source such as a lighter or candle.

In the interview Breiwa discusses DynaVap’s evolution from making its first pieces on South Bend Lathes to ordering its first new Traubs. He explains his philosophy to make simple yet elegant parts using complex CNC equipment which he hopes will make an impact.

You can learn more about DynaVap at www.dynavap.com.

Question: Can a solo inventor with a South Bend Lathe still change the world?

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Swarfcast Ep. 14 – Scott Livingston on Combining Cycling and Citizens in His Machining Business

By Noah and Lloyd Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with Scott Livingston.

Scott Livingston’s Grandfather Horst, after whom Horst Engineering Company in Connecticut was named, often talked about bicycles with Scott during his childhood.  Cycling was part of Horst’s life in Germany before he fled from the Nazis in 1938 and came to America.

Horst started his machining company in 1946, and Scott and his family run it today.  While the core business is now aerospace products made on Swiss screw machines and thread-rolled parts, a growing piece of the business is a niche product for bikers, toe spikes.

Scott and the Horst company have meshed a passion for cycling, especially the growing sport of cyclo-cross, which features many laps of short-course racing on pavement, wooded trails, grass and steep hills.  Cyclo-cross requires the rider to dismount and carry their cycle.  Riders usually end up muddy but smiling, riding sturdy bikes with fattish tires.  Good toe spikes are a must, and Horst’s are popular all over the world.

Scott and his family are regulars on the race circuit, and Horst sponsors a team.  Scott’s wife, who is also an ultramarathon runner, and his children join in the competitions.

The vision of Scott’s grandfather to develop a cycling product for his machining firm has been realized by Scott, and cycling has led to many networking opportunities for the company to find kindred spirits for Horst Manufacturing’s growing business.

Question: Have you been able to combine athletic interests and work?

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Swarfcast Ep. 13 – Jason Zenger on “Making Chips” and the Industrial Supplies Business

By Noah Graff

Scroll down to listen to the podcast with Jason Zenger.

In today’s podcast I interviewed Jason Zenger, president of Zenger’s Industrial Supply, in Melrose Park, Illinois, a company that specializes in selling tooling and industrial supplies to the metal working industry. Jason also has a popular podcast called “Making Chips,” which he cohosts with Jim Carr of Carr Machine & Tool.

Jason and I discussed how he eventually came to work at his family’s business and how it has grown and modernized over the years. Rather than simply distribute commodity products the company’s strategy is to become its customers’ single source supplier for tooling and machining accessories like drills, inserts, hand tools, etc.

I see some parallels between Jason’s podcast “Making Chips” and Today’s Machining World’s “Swarfcast” in our focus on similar topics in the metal working industry. Also for those of you baffled by our podcast’s and blog’s name, “Swarf” actually is a reference to the chips and grime in the belly of a metal cutting machine. One major difference between our podcasts is that “Swarfcast” is hosted by machinery dealers, while “Making Chips” is produced in the lens of a tooling and machinery supplies vender, and the owner of a machining company in Jim Carr.

Listen to “Making Chips” at https://www.makingchips.com/, or any apps (iTunes, etc.) where you get your podcasts.

Question: How are tariffs affecting your business?

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